Support
Subscribe
Subscribe to BirdNote

Sign up to receive a weekly email preview of the following week's shows!

Sign Up
Support BirdNote

Help BirdNote tell more stories, reach more people, and inspire action.

DONATE

You are here

Spring Migration Across the Globe

A flying grandeur!
© Patty McGann View Large

Each spring, millions of birds head north. From Ecuador, beautiful Scarlet Tanagers fly to the eastern US and Canada, many traversing the Gulf of Mexico, an arduous journey. Across much of southern Europe, Common Nightingales – small thrushes with russet feathers – are arriving, having traveled northward from Africa across immense deserts. In northern Asia, petite songbirds known as Siberian Rubythroats — like this one — are arriving en masse, some winging their way across the South China Sea from the Philippines, others over the mountains from Thailand.

Full Transcript

Transcript: 

BirdNote®  

Spring Migration Across the Globe

Written by Bob Sundstrom

This is BirdNote.
Each spring, millions of birds depart tropical Central and South America for the temperate climate of North America. The same phenomenon occurs simultaneously all across Europe and Asia, as vast numbers of birds head north from Africa, Australia, and southern Asia. 
From as far south as Ecuador, beautiful Scarlet Tanagers fly north, to nest in the eastern US and Canada, many traversing the Gulf of Mexico on their way. An arduous journey.
[Scarlet Tanager song, http://macaulaylibrary.org/audio/113516, 0.06-.09]
Across much of southern Europe, Common Nightingales – small thrushes with russet feathers – are arriving. These legendary singers have traveled northward from tropical Africa across immense deserts.
[Common Nightingale song, http://macaulaylibrary.org/audio/86190, 1.31-1.38]. 
In northern Asia, petite songbirds known as Siberian Rubythroats are arriving en masse, some winging their way across the South China Sea from the Philippines, others over the mountains from Thailand.
[Siberian Rubythroat song, http://macaulaylibrary.org/audio/71470, 0.30-33] 
These three examples, a tiny sample from among thousands of migratory species, only hint at the overall grandeur of worldwide avian migration. One of the most fundamental processes in all of nature.
Get a good look at these three birds — and all we feature on BirdNote — when you come to our website, BirdNote.org. I’m Mary McCann.

                                                                               ###

Bird sounds provided by The Macaulay Library of Natural Sounds at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York. 113516 recorded by Curtis A. Marantz, 86190 and 71470 recorded by Arnoud B. van den Berg.
BirdNote’s theme music was composed and played by Nancy Rumbel and John Kessler.
Producer: John Kessler
Executive Producer: Sallie Bodie
© 2017 Tune In to Nature.org   April 2017   Narrator: Mary McCann

ID#             migration-24-2017-04-11    migration-24

Related topics:

Related field notes:

Home
Shows
Galleries
More