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Donald Duck

The Duck in the Sailor Suit
© ¬© Walt Disney View Large

Today, we celebrate Donald Fauntleroy Duck, first sighted in Hollywood in 1934. Despite nearly 80 years on the big screen and more than 150 films and countless comic books to his credit, Donald's plumage has never changed. Donald doesn't migrate, but resides year round in Duckburg. To our knowledge, longtime sweetheart Daisy has never made Donald a father. But he does show a strong paternal instinct for a trio of unruly nephews. While he means well, he tends to get in over his head, but he somehow overcomes the odds. And that perhaps is why Donald Duck is still loved after all these years.

Full Transcript

Transcript: 
BirdNote® 

Donald Duck - The Duck in the Sailor Suit

Written by Bob Sundstrom

This is BirdNote.
Winter is the season of waterfowl, when ducks and geese flock to our ponds, lakes and bays. [Muttering of Mallards]
So let’s take a moment to celebrate one of our best-known waterfowl. [Donald says, “Yah, That’s right!”]
With his sleek white feathers and big orange bill, Donald Fauntleroy Duck was first sighted in Hollywood in 1934. Despite nearly four score years on the big screen and more than 150 films and countless comic books to his credit, Donald’s plumage has never changed: he still wears the same blue sailor’s suit, without pants. [Donald laughing]
Donald doesn’t migrate, but resides year round in Duckburg – except when a Disney adventure beckons. To our knowledge, longtime sweetheart Daisy has never made Donald a father [Daisy says, “Donald!” and Donald says, “Hiya, toots!”], but he shows a strong paternal instinct for a trio of unruly nephews. And his friendships extend beyond birds to other vertebrates, such as his colleagues Mickey and Goofy. [Goofy says “Gosh!”]
Donald is famously temperamental, and even a bit lazy. He means well, but tends to get in over his head. But stubborn and committed, he somehow overcomes the odds. And that perhaps is why he’s still loved after all these years. [Donald says “The darned  little rats!”]
  For BirdNote, I’m Michael Stein.
                                        ###
Sounds of mallards provided by The Macaulay Library of Natural Sounds at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York, recorded by A.A. Allen.
Producer: John Kessler
Executive Producer: Chris Peterson
© 2014 Tune In to Nature.org     January 2014   Narrator: Michael Stein

ID#        donaldduck-01-2012-01-06

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