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Conserving Canada's Boreal Forests

Consumer choices can help!

The vast Canadian boreal forest provides breeding habitat for almost half of North America's migratory ducks, geese, and songbirds - including this Olive-sided Flycatcher. But the boreal forest is under increasing pressure from logging, mining, the development of petroleum, infestations of pine beetles, and climate change. Good news: The Pew Environment Group and the Ivey Foundation have negotiated "the world's largest conservation agreement." Using recycled paper can help, too!

Full Transcript

Transcript: 
BirdNote®
Conserving Canada’s Boreal Forest

Written by Todd Peterson

This is BirdNote. 
[Songs and calls of birds that breed in Canada’s boreal forest]
The vast Canadian boreal forest provides breeding habitat for almost half of North America’s migratory ducks, geese, and songbirds. [1] The forest is summer home for three to five billion breeding birds [2] and it’s “one of the largest intact forest and wetland ecosystems remaining on earth.” [3]
[Croaking and “conversation” of ravens] 
 But the boreal forest is under increasing pressure from logging, mining, the development of petroleum, infestations of pine beetles, and climate change. There is, however, some good news.
[Call of Boreal Chickadee]  
The Pew Environment Group and the Ivey Foundation have negotiated “the world’s largest conservation agreement.” [4] It covers an area of the Canadian boreal forest larger than the country of France. The agreement involves 20 Canadian forestry companies and nine environmental organizations. It will suspend any new logging in an area the size of Montana for three years, allowing time to develop higher standards for sustainable forestry. 
[Calls of Sandhill Cranes] 
Richard Brooks, [Forest Campaign Coordinator] of Greenpeace Canada said, “Concerns from the public and the marketplace about wilderness conservation and species loss have been critical drivers in arriving at this agreement.” [5]
 The choices you make in what you buy – recycled paper, for example – do make a difference in the lives of birds. Today’s BirdNote brought to you by The Lufkin Family Foundation. Learn more at our website, BirdNote.org.
###
Sound track of the boreal forest provided by The Macaulay Library of Natural Sounds at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York and recorded by G.F. Budney.  Calls of Ravens and Sandhill Cranes were recorded by G.A. Keller; Boreal Chickadee by G. Vyn.
Producer: John Kessler
Executive Producer: Chris Peterson
© 2011 Tune In to Nature.org          February 2011     Narrator: Mary McCann

ID# SotB-boreal-01-2011-02-01      

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