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Bird Feeders and Whaling Ships

A sure way to brighten a winter mood

In the opening lines of Moby Dick, the narrator, Ishmael, confesses to "a damp, drizzly November in my soul." One sure way to brighten November's damp and drizzly mood is to welcome birds into your yard with birdfeeders. Black-oil sunflower seed is especially popular. Hang suet in a wire cage to attract a Northern Flicker like this one. Then, just add water, and you're all set.

Learn more about birdfeeding in your own back yard.

Full Transcript

Transcript: 
BirdNote®
Bird Feeders and Whaling Ships

Written by Bob Sundstrom
 
This is BirdNote!
In the opening lines of Melville’s masterpiece, Moby Dick, the narrator, Ishmael, confesses to “a damp, drizzly November in my soul.” An eloquent phrase indeed – words that also capture the mood of these gray, potentially soul-chilling fall and winter days.
Ishmael’s response was to go to sea on a whaling ship. [Creaking of ship] Not an option for most of us. But one sure way to brighten November’s damp and drizzly mood is to welcome birds into your yard with feeders and birdbaths. The liveliness and calls of a batch of chickadees, nuthatches, jays, or finches will break the spell of a dreary day.
Hang up a tube-shaped feeder full of black-oil sunflower seeds. Scatter a mix of millet and other seeds on a platform feeder or on the ground. Hang suet in a wire feeder. The more choices you offer, the greater variety of birds you’ll host. And nothing brings birds to a yard like a consistent source of water in a shallow basin. [Call notes of chickadees, Red-breasted Nuthatches, American Goldfinches]
 If the bustle, color, and sounds of the birds don’t break the dark mood, there’s always that whaling ship. [Sound of ocean waves] [Creaking of ship]
Learn a lot more about inviting birds to your yard – and how to protect them when they arrive! Begin at our website, BirdNote.org. [Call notes of birds]
###
Bird audio provided by The Macaulay Library of Natural Sounds at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York.  American Goldfinch call recorded by D.A. Sibley.  Red-breasted Nuthatch call recorded by R.C. Stein.  Black-capped Chickadee call recorded by R.S. Little.
Producer: John Kessler
Executive Producer: Chris Peterson
© 2013 Tune In to Nature.org      November 2016     Narrator: Michael Stein

ID# 111406ishmaelKPLU  feeder-03b

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