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Partners in Flight

BirdNote joins with Partners in Flight (PIF) to support bird conservation across the Western Hemisphere, bringing together public and private resources to help conserve species that migrate through and inhabit the Americas.

Partners in Flight / Compañeros en Vuelo / Partenaires d’Envol emphasizes the conservation of landbirds – raptors, grouse, flycatchers, warblers, finches, and other bird families that inhabit primarily terrestrial ecosystems. Through a collaboration of government agencies, conservation groups, industry, the academic community, and others, PIF aims to help species at risk, keep common birds common, and develop voluntary partnerships for birds, habitats, and people. PIF eagerly seeks participation from those interested in bird conservation.

Visit the Partners in Flight websites
www.partnersinflight.org
www.savingoursharedbirds.org

 

A Sampling of BirdNote Shows Featuring Partners in Flight and Migration

 

What Sudden Oak Death Means for Birds

In 1985, a pathogen called Sudden Oak Death began attacking California oaks. Year-round resident Oak Titmice need these trees to nest and feed. Learn more about the conservation plan of California Partners in Flight.
Listen >>

 

 

Short-eared Owl

This owl species is declining due to development, agriculture, and overgrazing. American Bird Conservancy and Partners in Flight consider this bird at risk. But the federal Conservation and Wetland Reserve Programs are showing promise. Listen >>

 

 

Responsible Birdfeeding

Show features tips from the California Partners in Flight about how to feed birds safely, including cleaning your feeder at least once a week and raking the ground underneath, too. Pine Siskins are especially prone to salmonellosis, a bacterial disease. Listen >>

 

 

Wilson's Warbler Migration

This Wilson's Warbler is one of many songbird migrants returning to the Central American tropics for the colder months. He'll take up precisely the same winter quarters as he did last year, amid the rows of coffee growing in the shade of tall trees. Listen >>

 

 

Morning in Oaxaca

A winter morning in Oaxaca, Mexico, will show you "our" Yellow-rumped Warblers and Western Tanagers mingling with tropical resident Berylline Hummingbirds, Gray Silky-Flycatchers, and this Crescent-chested Warbler. Listen >>

  

 

Swainson's Hawks Migrate South

In autumn, hundreds of thousands of Swainson's Hawks migrate to South America. With the help of a satellite tracking device, we follow an individual male from Alberta, through Nebraska, Mexico, Honduras, to Argentina. Listen >>

 

 

Shorebirds Head South

It's September, and millions of shorebirds are on the move, some from their nesting grounds on the high Arctic all the way to South America. This young Hudsonian Godwit may fly between Hudson Bay and as far south as Tierra del Fuego! Listen >>

  

 

Cerulean Warblers Link Conservation on Two Continents

In winter, the Cerulean Warbler forages in tree-tops of the Andes Mountains. In May, the very same bird sings from the tree-tops in the Appalachian Mountains. The Cerulean Warbler is one of the most threatened birds in the US. Listen >>

 

 

Where Swallows Go in Winter

By October, most swallows in the United States have flown south in search of insects. The eight species of swallows that nest in the US - including this Cliff Swallow - migrate south to Central or even South America. 
Listen >>

 

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