Support
Subscribe
Subscribe to BirdNote

Sign up to receive a weekly email preview of the following week's shows!

Sign Up
Support BirdNote

Help BirdNote tell more stories, reach more people, and inspire action.

DONATE

You are here

Red Knot (Calidris canutus)

Related shows:

Match Birds with Their Habitats

Particular birds are tied to particular habitats. An American Bittern calls from a freshwater marsh. Wild Turkeys like open woods, with fields and clearings. The House Wren favors gardens, hedgerows, and brushy woods. This Red Knot feeds on beaches and mudflats. The Mourning Dove likes brushy,... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  vocalization

Red Knots and Horseshoe Crabs

The Red Knot returns to the Delaware Bay each May to feed. These sandpipers are on their way to their nesting grounds in the northern Arctic and stop here to refuel - their stopover coincides with the spawning of horseshoe crabs. But beginning in the 1980s, vast numbers of the crabs were... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  migration

Mapping Songbird Migration with Geolocators

Devices called geolocators are giving us new insights into how, when, and where birds migrate. They record daily changes in light levels at different latitudes and longitudes by recording the time of each sunrise and sunset. And by attaching them to migrating birds - like this Red Knot -... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  migration, science

Long-distance Migration - A House of Cards?

Scott Weidensaul, author of Living on the Wind, says “. . . the longest, most amazing, most awe-inspiring migrations are the ones that are most delicately balanced. And if you perturb any of the supports on which it depends, the whole thing collapses like a house of cards.” Fortunately, the U.S.... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  ecology, migration

Red Knot Flies to the Moon and Back

A trip to the moon would mean a flight of 239,000 miles, roughly the same as circling the Earth 10 times. This Red Knot, named B95 for its band number, is nicknamed "Moonbird." Why? This male sandpiper was first banded in 1995 and spotted again -- on his migration through New Jersey -- in May... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  migration, ornithology, science

Red Knot Migration

Thanks to radio transmitters, scientists have vastly increased their knowledge of Red Knot migration patterns. For example, the vast majority of Red Knots on the Pacific Coast rely on a small number of places to rest and feed during spring migration from Mexico to the Arctic. Those locations... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  migration
Home
Shows
Galleries
More